Richard Byrne, MD

Advanced Procedures: How to Create a Pericardiocentesis Model

Pericardiocentesis is a rarely performed, but potentially life-saving procedure. Commerical models are prohibitively expensive, but students and residents (and critical care fellows) still need to learn the mechanics, ideally with an ultrasound compatibile model. This week's post gives a step by step guide towards making a cheap, easy to fabricate phantom based on this fantastic paper published in the Journal of Emergency Medicne 2012: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21925818

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Trials Instead of Tragedy: Unexplained dyspnea on exertion in a healthy young physician....

Think just because you are a young, healthy physician that you are invinceable? Read this post and remember that we are vulnerable too...even more so because we often refuse to acknowledge when we are sick. This week's Advanced Practice topic comes to us courtesy of a Cooper EM alum. The story is told with full permission from the patient, his wife, though names are omitted to prevent any possible HIPPA entanglements!

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Advanced Practice - Paracentesis-induced circulatory dysfunction (PICD)

Do you routinely perform large volume (or near large volume) paracentesis in your ED? If so, you need to know about a potentially life-threatening complication of this procedure...

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An Alternative Abortive Therapy in Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia Pain Crisis

A 34 yo female with a history of trigeminal neuralgia presented to the Emergency Department with a chief complaint of 5 days of severe, worsening paroxysms of pain in the left trigeminal nerve distribution. The pain was refractory to carbamazepine and gabapentin. Neurology was consulted and an unconventional therapy was recommended.

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#EMconf: "Signs and Symptoms You Would Like to be Sued for Malpractice"

What's with the empty conference room? This week the Cooper EM Residents attended Resident Wellness Conference in Philadelphia, so today's content is from a lecture from November's module "Acute Signs and Symptoms" Enjoy!

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Airway Mastery Series: Mastering the Bougie

You are intubating a sick patient in the ED via direct laryngoscopy. After opening the airway, sweeping the tongue with your blade, inserting into the vallecula, and lifting at the precisely correct angle your eyes behold....well...not the vocal cords! Maybe the arytenoid cartilages if you're lucky (aka Cormack Lehane 3 or 4 view). But wait, you aren't finished yet! You reach into your back pocket and remove your trusty bougie...

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