Monday

Burns

Summer is finally here! Hopefully, that means getting hot from fun in the sun and warmer weather. With summer, however, comes the opportunity to get burned..sun burned, burns from BBQs or bonfires. Read on below for a review of how to categorize thermal burns and calculate BSA in both Adult and Pediatric patients.   

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Back to the Basics: Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron) Dermatitis

As the weather becomes nicer, more people are venturing outside to work on their yards, hike and just take in the sun - and hence, more people are becoming exposed to poison ivy, oak, and sumac.  Learn the basic management for toxicodendron dermatitis. 

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Pearls on some of the less common Tick Borne Illnesses

Summer is fast approaching (woohoo)! For many of us living in endemic areas, that means we need to consider tick borne illnesses in many of our differentials of patients with flu-like illnesses and possibly a rash. Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever are often the diseases that we remember easily. Below are some pearls to help clinch the diagnosis of some of the lesser known tick borne illnesses or, in some cases, answer a test question correctly!

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Acute Triggers of Atrial Fibrillation

It is understood that chronic conditions such as hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and valvular disease (just to name a few) are risk factors for the development of atrial fibrillation. However, in the ED it is important that we are aware of the acute triggers of atrial fibrillation, some of which are associated with significant morbidity and mortality.

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Back to Basics: Ocular Herpes Simplex vs Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus

While both ocular herpes simplex and herpes zoster ophthalmicus can cause a red, painful eye, there are some important distinctions to make when diagnosing and treating each of these entities.  

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Back to Basics: Open & Depressed Skull Fractures

This post is not intended to be a comprehensive review of skull fracture types and management, but rather a discussion of two subtypes of skull fracture – open and depressed fractures.  I chose this topic because it’s something I saw frequently during my recent elective working in an emergency department in Kumasi, Ghana.  In the United States at trauma centers these patients are frequently managed immediately by neurosurgery; however, with few consultants available, I was able to be more involved in the prolonged care of these patients. If faced with these types of severe head/skull injuries in a community hospital, it is important to feel comfortable with the initial management.  

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