Saturday

B Virus and 70% Mortality

While most patients presenting to the Emergency Department live in the immediate region surrounding the hospital, modern day travel allows patients to have recent exposures from the far reaches of the globe. One particular zoonotic infection, B Virus, carries a 70% mortality rate if not treated promptly. This post aims to introduce the B Virus and summarize the "need-to-know" as a practicing Emergency Physician:

B Virus:

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Night Shift Aid?: Caffeine Impregnated Gum from the Military

Staying alert and functioning at a high level during an overnight shift in the Emergency Department is often a matter of life or death for your patients. Many of us employ the use of caffeine at all hours to combat the slow (sometimes rapid) creep of fatigue which hampers our skillset. Most providers can relate to those moments when a cup of coffee is just not what you are looking for. This post intends to introduce an alternative vehicle for caffeine designed for members of the military: Military Energy Gum. 

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Is the Use of Ketamine As An Alternative to Etomidate During Rapid Sequence Intubation of Adult Trauma Patient's Safe?

The most commonly used induction agent for rapid sequence intubation in the acutely injured patient is etomidate, largely due to its rapid onset of action and hemodynamically "neutral" effects. The dose-dependent effect of etomidate in suppressing adrenal synthesis of cortisol leading to adrenal insufficiency has left the door open for ketamine to be also considered as the rapid induction agent of choice in these critically injured patients.

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Orthopedic Injuries Around the NFL: Jordan Reed's Acromioclavicular Joint Separation

During Week 12 of this NFL season, Washington Redskins tight end Jordan Reed injured his shoulder while attempting to catch a pass in the endzone against the Dallas Cowboys. While Reed continued to finish the first half, he was diagnosed with an AC joint separation at halftime. This posts will give an review of the evaluation and management of AC joint separations in the ED.

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Do Residents Affect Press Ganey Scores?

In the era of Press Ganey, patient-oriented outcomes, hospital reimbursement, and physician compensation are all tied to patient satisfaction. Improving patient satisfaction is now a multi-billion dollar industry and encroaches on every aspect of healthcare, including residency training. How do doctors at the beginning of their careers affect patient satisfaction and impact Press Ganey Scores? This post reviews two studies shedding light on this issue.

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Orthopedic Injuries Around the NFL: Tony Romo's Lumbar Spine Compression Fracture

During a preseason exhibition game of this NFL season, Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo suffered a compression fracture of his lumbar spine against the Seattle Seahawks. While this was not a season-ending injury for Romo, the veteran quarterback lost his starting position to the exceptional play of rookie quarterback Dak Prescott during his absence. Also included in this post is key pearls about a Chance fracture, another important fracture of the thoracic/lumbar spine!

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Two Most Common Golf Injuries and What to Tell Your Patients (And Yourself)

There are an estimated 25 million golfers in the United States. Every time they step onto the course they spend hours walking in the sun and placing stress on their backs and nearly every joint in their bodies. It should be no surprise if one of these patients make their way into one of your Emergency Departments or Urgent Cares. Below are two of the most common golf injuries as well as pearls on how to prevent/treat them:

Low Back Pain/Strain:

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