Neurology

Status Epilepticus: Go-To-Meds

Your patient is seizing, your benzo didn't work, what's next?  

Knowing your action plan for a patient in status epilepticus is crucial. Preparation = success! Review this chart until you've got a 1st, 2nd & 3rd line medication, with doses, always ready in your mind. If you've got this down already, how about for pediatrics?

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Board Review: Neurology

A 26 year old male presents to your Emergency Department with bilateral lower extremity weakness.  He states he recently had a “stomach bug” following a camping trip.  You suspect Guillain-Barre Syndrome.  Which of the following is most consistent with GBS?

A) CSF with elevated protein 

B) Hyperreflexia

C) Facial droop 

D) Sterile pyuria 

E) Vesicular rash 

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Board Review: Anti-epileptics

Which anti-epileptic is most likely to cause hyponatremia? 

A. Carbamazepine

B. Dilantin

C. Valproic Acid 

D. Lacosamide

E. Levetiracetam

 

 

 

 

 

Answer is A - Carbamazepine or Tegretol

Bonus Question: What is the first line management in Trigeminal Neuralgia? 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer: Carbamazepine or Tegretol

 

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Back to Basics: Decompression Illness

While the scuba diving decompression illnesses of decompression sickness and arterial gas embolism are treated the same, the pathophysiology and presentation are different.

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