Obstetrics/Gynecology

Advanced Practice: Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence and Evisceration

Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence and Evisceration After Total Hysterectomy

Incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence after hysterectomy ranges from 0.14-4.1%.

Risk factors include post-operative infection, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, early return to sexual intercourse, constipation

Surgical emergency with risk of bowel necrosis.

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Back to Basics: Postpartum Hemorrhage

As EM physicians, we receive training in obstetrics. While most of us don't walk into a shift *hoping* for a delivery, we are trained to handle these cases if the present. Postpartum hemorrhage can be a complication of even a "normal" delivery. Read on below for some pearles regarding how to manage a postpartum hemorrhage.

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Back to Basics: Vaginal Bleeding in Late Pregnancy

You're working in your new hospital without ObGyn coverage and your triage nurse informs you that "there is a woman bleeding up front...she looks pregnant." You begin to run a differential through your head of what that problem could be. Read on below for diagnoses to consider.

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Board Review: OB/GYN

A 29-year-old woman presents for heavy vaginal bleeding. She is hemodynamically stable. She had an uncomplicated vaginal delivery of a full-term baby 1 week ago. She denies fever or pain. There is active bleeding from the os. No cervical motion tenderness or signs of trauma or foul-smelling discharge. What is the most likely diagnosis? 

A. Uterine Atony

B. Retained products of conception

C. Cervical Trauma

D. Endometritis 

 

 

 

 

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Advanced Practice: Supportive Management of Critical Illness in Pregnancy

The nurse calls you to the room of a 34 year old crashing patient....and she happens to be pregnant.  Here are the pearls for resuscitation and management of the critically ill pregnant patient. 

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Advanced Practice: Cardiac Arrest in Pregnancy

A very gravid patient arrives in your ED after sudden cardiac arrest. You begin to panic as you wonder what differences you need to consider for a pregnant patient in cardiac arrest. Lucky for you, you are an avid EM Daily reader!

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