Tips

Back to Basics: Informed Consent

You’re working a shift in the Emergency Department and your patient needs an LP. You grab an informed consent form and head into the room to discuss the procedure with the patient... Of course you know you have to discuss risks and benefits and get the patient to sign the form, but what does "informed consent" actually mean?

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Back to the Basics: Breaking Bad News, Cancer Findings in the ED

Delivering bad news, such as concern for a new cancer diagnosis, is difficult in any setting. In the ED, we are often faced with additional challenges - limited information, time constraints, lack of established relationship with patients, and many others. Yet it is crucial we learn to do this well - here is some guidance to get started.

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Critical Cases: Tips for a Perfect Reduction

Do you feel like you pour your heart, soul, blood, sweat, and tears into your fracture/reductions and still come up short? Does the orthopedics consultant always want to "re-do" your attempt? Here is a repost of a podcast interview between former Cooper EM resident Patrick Sheehan, former Cooper Orthopedics Resident Joseph Legatol on how to get a perfect reduction. Inside the interview are 5 tips on positioning yourself for success. Also included is a video of Dr. Sheehan giving an example of "exaggerating the injury" of a distal radius fracture for a more successful reduction. 

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Critical Cases - Back pain bounceback!

A 55 year old male presents to the ED with complaints of anterior chest pain radiating through to the thoracic area X 2 days...you mentally run through a check list of the potential "red flag" signs/symptoms for serious back pain before you enter the room. Will this be another benign musculoskeletal pain or something more sinister?

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Advanced Practice: "Signs and Symptoms You Would Like to be Sued for Malpractice"

Read on for a summary of a lecture from Dr. Richard Byrne on common themes in ED malpractice. Knowledge of the high risk patients and diagnoses is the first and best defense against diagnostic error!

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